Sunday, 16 April 2017

Thorns and More Thorns


"Solanum pyracanthum -- Porcupine Tomato", drawing by Sarah "Sallie" Thayer, 2017




Today I am featuring two new drawings which focus on flowering, thorny plants.  Good Friday always makes me think of thorns and, thus, it seemed to be that this weekend might be the one for sharing these new artistic efforts.

The first plant featured is Solanum pyracanthum. This is the botanical name for the porcupine tomato or devil’s thorn. Solanum is the genus of the tomato, potato and deadly Nightshade family and this plant bears many discrete resemblances to these plants, particularly to tomatoes. Native to tropical Madagascar and the islands of the western Indian Ocean, it has been introduced into many countries over the years but, thankfully, has not shown itself to be invasive. This is because the plant is very slow to reproduce and birds avoid the berries, so the seeds don’t get distributed easily. 

While many people consider thorns to be a drawback in plants, the thorns on a porcupine tomato are quite striking and are, in fact, the first thing you notice about this plant. The gray-green leaves give way to red-orange thorns which grow straight up on the sides of the leaves. Along with the colorful thorns, there are also lavender/blue flowers. The flowers are shaped much like other members of the Solanum family and have yellow centers. The back of each petal has a white stripe that runs from the tip to the base. 

The leaves, flowers and fruit of the plant are poisonous. Like many members of the Solanum genus, particularly Deadly Nightshade, the porcupine tomato contains highly toxic tropane alkaloids. 

The genus name of Solanum is from the Latin and means “solace” or “quietude” (referring to the narcotic properties of some species). The specific name of pyracanthum comes from the Latin and means “fire thorn”.








"Euphorbia milii -- Crown of Thorns", drawing by Sarah "Sallie" Thayer, 2017





I previously featured a drawing this particular plant (Euphorbia milii) back in 2009 [see drawing below right]. However, with all the Lenten reminders of the passion of Christ, I decided to do another drawing -- this time making the thorns more prominent.




"Euphorbia milii -- Crown of Thorns, 2009",
drawing by Sarah "Sallie" Thayer
Euphorbia milii, of the family Euphorbiaceae, is a woody, spiny, climbing succulent shrub with shoots reaching a height of six feet. While the plant appears to have sizable pink flowers, the “flowers” are actually pink leaves (bracts) while the flowers are the tiny bits growing in the centre. 

Euphorbia milii is also known as “Crown of Thorns” or the "Christ Plant" as tradition has it that this plant was used to make the crown of thorns with which the Roman soldiers are said to have crowned Christ. Although the plant originated in Madagascar, there is substantial evidence that the species had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ. The plants send out thorny stems which are very pliable and could easily have been intertwined into a circle. The sap of Euphorbia milii can cause severe dermatitis on the skin of those who are susceptible and it is poisonous when ingested. 

The genus name, Euphorbia, was first published by Carolus Linnaeus in the first edition of Species Plantarum in 1753. However, it can be traced back as far as 79 A.D. to the Roman officer, Pliny the Elder, as it is mentioned in his book, Natural History of Pliny. The genus, Euphorbia, honours an African physician named Euphorbus who lived during the lst century A.D. The species name, milii, commemorates Baron Milius, once governor of Reunion, who in 1821 introduced the species to France.







Much of the text above was taken from various Internet sources.
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BRADEN AND RÒNÀN




Here are the boys after their Easter Egg Hunt with their Easter greeting.  




"Happy Easter Everyone!"




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SUKI AND SALLIE





Suki with her favourite toy in MY chair!
Poor Suki!  I have been treating her very kindly ever since Thursday evening.  Why?  Well, let me tell you the whole, sad story...

Suki had an appointment scheduled with the vet for this past Thursday morning at 10:30.  All that was supposed to occur during this visit was a bit of "bloodletting" so that the blood tests done six weeks ago could be repeated. We arrived at the clinic about 10:20 and were quickly taken into an exam room.

After the vet assistant had removed Suki from the case and weighed her (no significant weight loss yet I am sorry to say), she asked me if Suki was fasting.  Shocked, I replied, "No. I'm sorry, but no one told me that she should be fasting."

The young woman apologized and said that whoever had made the appointment should have informed me about the need for Suki to be fasting when her blood was drawn.  So, unsure what to do, off she went to check with the vet as to whether the blood work could be done if Suki had eaten breakfast.

She returned to inform me that they would not be able to get the correct results unless Suki was fasting.  Thankfully, she then informed me that the vet had suggested a possible solution.  If I was willing to leave Suki there until the afternoon, they would take her blood once 9-10 hours had elapsed (she had her breakfast at 5:30) and then either she or the vet would drop Suki off at my place on their way home (both live in my neighbourhood).

I immediately thought that this was a really nice thing for them to offer to do and, so, I quickly agreed to their plan.  After scratching Suki's head once more and telling her that I would see her later, I left for home. Of course, I was not really settled for the rest of the day as the vet's assistant had mentioned that if they finished early, Suki could be home by mid-afternoon.

As it turned out, Suki did not get back home until just after 6 p.m. The assistant telephoned me at 5:45 to tell me that the vet, herself, would be bringing Suki home. I quickly got myself organized and then went down to the lobby to watch for them. When I saw the vet's car pull up, I went out outside and the transfer was quickly made.  I thanked her profusely while she informed me that the results of Suki's blood work should be available by Monday or Tuesday and that she will phone to inform me of the findings.

After saying goodbye, I rushed (as much as I am able to rush these days) upstairs and opened the cat carrier.  Out stalked a very indignant Miss Suki. She began to carefully inspect every inch of our living space, including the closets, meowing loudly the entire time.  Truly, I am grateful that I have never figured out how to speak or understand cat language as I fear that her comments during this inspection tour may have been the sort which would require me to put a lot of "bleeps" into this paragraph!

After eating a small amount of food, Suki then began to take short naps from which she would awaken meowing loudly.  Each time this happened, I would gently call her name a few times.  She would then stop her cries and settle down for another short nap. Eventually, she came and jumped up onto my lap and there she stayed until I got up to prepare our suppers.  By the time of her bedtime snack, she seemed to be pretty much back to normal; however, I do vaguely recall that she jumped into bed with me soon after I had fallen asleep.  She was still next to me when I awakened the next morning.

I will inform you of the results of her blood tests on April 30th which is when I plan to make my next blog posting. Hopefully, the news will all be good.


As for me, I continue to be and do the same.  I have had a couple of medical appointments over the past two weeks, but, as usual these days, they were just follow-up type appointments with nothing new to report.


Meanwhile, let me wish you all a very joyful Easter Season.




Καλο Πασχα
Срећан Ускрс
Wesołych Świąt Wielkanocnych
Happy Easter

  




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